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U.S. and Iran Both Attack ISIS, but Try Not to Look Like Allies
Cat : Terrorism
Date : 05/12/2014                      Reader : 73

H.D.A : NO DOUBT THAT ISIS HAVE BEEN CREATED SUDDENLY 7MONTHS AGO UNDER AGREEMENT BETWEEN AXE OF EVIL AND IRAN!!70% OF ISIS WEAPONS ARE AMERICANS DELIVERED TO THEM BY MALIKI ACCORDING TO US ORDERS!!EASY WITHDRAWAL OF ARMY ,LEAVING ALL HEAVY WEAPONS FOR ISIS IS ANOTHER HINT!!US,IRAN ATTACK ISIS BUT NOT LIKE ALLIES AS NYT ADMITS!!ISIS SOLD OIL TO SYRIA!!ISIS FIGHTS TRUE RESISTANCE AGAINST ASSAD REGIME!!ISIS MAIN R4OLE IS TO INTERCEPT ISLAMIC KHILAFA,AND TRUE MUJAHIDEEN OF SUNNI FAITH!!TO OPEN WAY WIDE FOR ZIONIST GREAT ISRAEL!!

 

nyt      5-12-2014

U.S. and Iran Both Attack ISIS, but Try Not to Look Like Allies

 

BAGHDAD — Iranian fighter jets struck extremist targets in Iraq recently, Iranian and American officials have confirmed, in the latest display of Tehran’s new willingness to conduct military operations openly on foreign battlefields rather than covertly and through proxies.

The shift stems in part from Iran’s deepening military role in Iraq in the war against the Sunni extremists of the Islamic State. But it also reflects a profound change in Iran’s strategy, stepping from the shadows into a more overt use of hard power as it promotes Shiite influence around the region.

Iranian and Pentagon officials acknowledged that Iran had stepped up its military operations in Iraq last week, using 1970s-era fighter jets to bomb targets in a buffer zone that extends 25 miles into Iraq.
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The new military approach highlights an unusual confluence of interests in both Iraq and Syria, where Tehran and Washington find themselves fighting the same enemy in an increasingly public fashion. While there is no direct coordination between Iran and the United States, there is a de facto nonaggression pact that neither side is eager to acknowledge.
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“We are flying missions over Iraq, we coordinate with the Iraqi government as we conduct those,” Rear Adm. John F. Kirby, the Pentagon spokesman, said Tuesday. “It’s up to the Iraqi government to de-conflict that airspace.”

For months, Iran has flashed its military prowess around the region. It has offered weapons to the Lebanese Army and supported the Shiite Houthi rebels in Yemen who have taken over the capital, Sana, where a car bomb struck the Iranian ambassador’s residence on Wednesday.

In Syria, Hezbollah, the Iranian-supported Shiite militant movement, and the Iranian paramilitary Al Quds force, have kept President Bashar al-Assad in power. And in Iraq, Iran’s once-elusive spymaster, Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, the commander of the Quds force who has spent a career in the shadows orchestrating terrorist attacks — including some that killed American soldiers in Iraq — has emerged as a public figure, with pictures of him on Iraq’s battlefields popping up on social media.

The apparent shift in Iran’s strategy has been most noticeable in Iraq, where even American officials acknowledge the decisive role of Iranian-backed militias, particularly in protecting Baghdad from an assault by the Islamic State, also known as ISIS or ISIL, but also working with the American-led air campaign.

While Iran’s increasingly public military role has proved essential in repelling the advances of the Islamic State, American officials worry that it could ultimately destabilize Iraq by deepening sectarian divisions. Iraq’s Sunnis blame the Iranian-backed Shiite militias for sectarian abuses, and are reluctant to join in the fight against extremists because of Iran’s influence.

Admiral Kirby said: “Our message to Iran is the same today as it was when it started, and as it is to any neighbor in the region that is involved in the anti-ISIL activities. And that’s that we want nothing to be done that further inflames sectarian tensions in the country.”
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The admiral, who indirectly confirmed the airstrikes by saying that he had “no reason to believe” the reports about them were untrue, said that they appeared so far to be limited.


 
 
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